Turkey

Turkey is sailing to the European Union slowly, but it is sailing. That is very important. The Finnish Mr Olli Rehn (a friend of the turkish president Mr Abdullah Gül)

does know that many politicians in the EU are subjective regarding the negotiations between Turkey and the EU. But he repeated a few times that Turkey (Mr Rehn said “The train” as far as I remember) is still on rail. That’s what is important.

Each day is a victory for Turkey (as well as for all the politicians and the people who support Turkey). Because each day Turkey is deeply changing, on the one hand thanks to political stability and on the other hand thanks to the EU compass.

A lot of people, both in Turkey and in the EU, are working hard so that Turkey improves itself and adapts its laws to the ones of the EU.

The common goal of Turkey and the EU is to help Turkey to become a more modern and a more harmonious country. Lots of people are involved in this plan. The second goal of many politicians of the EU and Turkey is to end the negotiations with the full EU membership of Turkey.

Most of the politicians of the EU support Turkey’s EU membership for economic reasons (whereas Turkey has always wanted to be an EU member for political reasons). But many think that Turkey’s EU membership is above all a peace plan involving the whole planet. However I have to stress that it has nothing to do with religion. In the future people will say the following: “Turkey’s EU membership contributed to a better world”.

Eventually, in spite of the anti-Turkey politicians of the EU who do everything they can so that the negotiations are completely blocked, I am really optimistic. They aim at sinking the turkish ship but they won’t succeed.

Regarding Turkey’s EU path, being optimistic is realistic. As far as I’m concerned, Turkey’s EU membership will be the most important historic event since the European Economic Community was created.

Article n°1
A commentator whose name is Chris Green TRNC, wrote this: “Ankara has made it clear that Cyprus will not be sacrificed on the alter of the EU….”

I agree with him.

“….and given the recent attitude shown in south Nicosia there’s no chance of any acceptable settlement for either side by April.”

I believe that a solution will be found because the turkish side supports the reunification of Cyprus, and above all because the greek Cypriots and the European Union do know what will happen if the greek Cypriots don’t show any willingness in finding a solution. I deal with that issue here

Article n°2
I quote: “According to the scenario floated in Ankara, Greek Cypriots have plans to put the ball in Turkey’s court, anticipating that pro-reunification President Talat will be defeated in the April presidential elections in the north and that he will be replaced by a more hawkish candidate who will drag the reunification talks into a deadlock. Under the plan, that situation would make the Turkish side pay the price of a failure and complicate Turkey’s European Union process, while showing the Greek Cypriots as the party that pushed hard for a settlement but failed to do so due to the attitude adopted by the Turkish side.”

That ridiculous and twisted plan will not occur. Because the whole world knows the situation. It knows the mistakes, the subjective stance, and the insane plan of the European Union regarding the negotiations between the turkish and greek Cypriots and the negotiations between Turkey and the EU.

Everybody knows that Turkey has loads of ennemies (politicians, journalists, lobbies….) in the world, and above all within the EU. But I’m really not surprised to face with people who are used to denying that Turkey has such ennemies. Anyway, if there were not so many anti-Turkey politicians in the European Union, more negotiation chapters would have been opened, like Croatia. But Mr Sarkozy didn’t hesitate to block several chapters. Why did he block 8 chapters? That is a quite subjective move.

Yes, Turkey has many ennemies. For instance, I remember that some Kurds, manipulated by a norwegian lobby, threw eggs to Mr Erdoğan nearly 6 years ago, perhaps it was in Norway or Denmark, I’m not sure. With the Kurds there was a norwegian blonde woman, watching at their side.
Well some norwegians “support” the pro-PKK Kurds because a norwegian company has oil interests in northern Irak, Kerkük as far as I remember. I already knew who was that woman when I watched that eggs show. She was there manipulating those Kurds and smiling, it was a very ugly show. When I saw her smiling I felt disgusted. I already knew her because several months before she was in southeastern Turkey and made the propaganda of the PKK: she provoked a pro-PKK demonstration. She was there in order to create chaos. A kurdish-rooted official of the south-eastern Turkey said at that time that some NGOs are fake and that they aim at provoking chaos in Turkey.

The PKK does not represent the kurdish-rooted turkish citizens. I don’t know how many kurdish-rooted turkish citizens support the PKK in Turkey, but I know that most of the kurdish-rooted citizens don’t support the PKK.

Another example: I read a few months ago an article on ABhaber which dealt with an EU politican who shouted at a pro-Turkey EU politician at the EU parliament regarding the kurdish issue. That anti-Turkey politician said: “The fighters of the PKK are fighters of freedom”.

So the PKK killed 40 000 people, and according to some people they are “Fighters of freedom”??

That politician (who is not isolated) supports the PKK, which is a terrorist organization recognized by the EU. Many politicians of the EU support the PKK and make people believe that it represents the kurdish-rooted turkish citizens in order to destabilize Turkey. By the way, the politicians of the EU who object to Turkey’s EU membership deeply wish the turkish army to make a coup in order to freeze completely the negotiations.

To conclude, the most striking example which proves that many politicians of the EU want to destabilize Turkey is the following one: their strong support to the PKK.

But the kurdish opening of the turkish government is destroying the PKK and the plan of those who support it. Turkey is succeeding in resolving the kurdish issue. The kurdish opening is not finished, but it is already very efficient. The following events prove it: click here and there

It’s thanks to positive events like these ones that we can say that Turkey’s future is bright.

By the way, the turkish Chief of General Staff General İlker Başbuğ said nearly two years ago this:

“It was a mistake to not have provided cultural rights with the kurdish-rooted citizens”.

Turkey has been deeply changing for several years. Furthermore, Mr Ali Babacan said recently that 12 billion turkish pounds were invested last year in the south-eastern of Turkey (I believe that it was 12 billion, but I’ve forgotten the towns in which that money was invested). And much more money will be invested in the south-eastern, since the turkish state wants this aera to be modern. More has to be done of course.

Through sport too the government aims at helping the young people to integrate into society. So this aera will be cleaned, in other words the propaganda of the PKK will not be as efficient as before.

Article n°3
Regarding its nuclear plants (3 plants at $ 5 billion each), will Turkey choose the french Areva? If Areva loses the contract, no one will be suprised. Anyway, I am of those who say a big “No” to nuclear energy.

Some eastern countries of the European Union recently accepted to receive the nuclear waste of some western countries of the EU. The ones who support nuclear energy should unveil their solution regarding the waste. So, in their opinion, polluting our neighbours would be the best solution?!

Article n°4
Chris Green TRNC wrote the following: “I think the manner in which France deports itself in general in Turkish matters is such that they have something of a cheek effectively coming cap in hand to Turkey! On the one hand they are, in the form of the odious and diminutive Sarkozy rabidly opposed to Turkeys accession into the EU aided and abetted obviously by Greece yet on the other they are quite happy to come with their begging bowls! Turkey are spending quite a bit of money with the EU in aircraft sales at least much of which benefits France. No one is a greater fan of world trade than I but in the circumstances I think this franco move is a it `rich`!”

In 2004 Turkey signed a contract of 36 Airbus planes. That occured before the decision to open the negotiations between Turkey and the European Union was taken. Well I support the improvement of the relations between France and Turkey, but it will be hard because of the swindling Mr Sarkozy. Why? You will know why by reading this article of mine in english

If you prefer to read in French (read the 3rd paragraph) click here

Mr Sarkozy will most probably lose the next elections, only then I foresee a meaningful improvement in the relations between France and Turkey.

Article n°5
In 2004, the french TV channel news named France 2 “celebrated” the women’s day with an anti-Turkey propanganda (it’s just an example among many): France 2 decided to deal with an honour killing in Turkey and with another turkish honour killing in Germany.

So some journalists of France 2 didn’t find something better than two horrible turkish news to celebrate that international women’s day. I would not have said that it was an anti-Turkey propaganda if France 2 had dealt with only one crime in Turkey, however it also dealt with another turkish crime in Germany, and moreover, those crimes didn’t happen the same day.

Anyway I’ve been watching France 2 since I’m a kid, and I was not surprised to witness once more the anti-Turkey propaganda of France 2. Why did not France 2 deal with the people who fight for a better democracy in Turkey? The ones who fight for the women’s rights?

There is another franco-german TV channel news named Arte, which makes the propaganda of the terrorist organization the PKK. When Arte Info deals with some Kurds of Turkey (Arte Info always goes to Diyarbakir, a town where the propaganda of the PKK is efficient because of poverty), the map of Turkey shown is always divided in southeastern Turkey and “Kurdistan” is written. That proves that Arte Info does not respect the frontiers of Turkey and makes the propaganda of the PKK.

Moreover when France 2 and Arte info deal with Turkey, very often they only show the religious aeras. Thus they aim at making people believe that in Turkey everybody are very religious. In this article in french I explain in one paragraph that anti-Turkey propaganda.

Article n°6
I will not quote any sentence from this article, everybody ought to read it carefully. And everybody ought to read that article (in english) carefully too. Because I will not quote anything from it neither.

Lastly, it goes without saying that Turkey does need a new consitution. But owing to the opposition, the government didn’t succeed in writing a brand new one. We just have to allow some more time, and Turkey will have a constitution that it deserves.

A reminder: all the EU states signed and recognized Turkey an official candidate to the EU in 1999 at Helsinki. All the EU states signed in 2004 in order to open the negotiations in 2005. The EU parliament (the direct representative of the citizens of the EU) approved the opening of the negotiations, thus it was democratically that the EU gave its approval to the opening of the negotiations, which goal is the full membership.

Therefore, saying that Turkey is not in Europe or is not european makes no sense (by the way, are Malta and south Cyprus in Europe?). The rules can’t be changed. Only irresponsible or bad head of states still question whether Turkey is in Europe.

Eventually, if Turkey was not in Europe, why did the EU recognize it an official candidate to the EU? Why did the EU open the negotiations? Instead of attacking Turkey (as if Turkey was responsible for the problems of the EU), the politicians and the people should focus on our big issues such as unemployment, environment, or the GMOs (Mr Barroso is a very bad politician, he seems to approve the GMOs, whereas most of the EU citizens object to them. Mr Barroso doesn‘t understand what democracy means, click here. Is that the first step for more GMOs in the EU? Well I‘ve begun to have some doubts about the EU. Many of its politicians are corrupt, and many (industrial) lobbies are powerful. Some people have too much power. That‘s worrying.).

Best regards,

Cem

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  1. I’ve been reading your blog for a few months now and figured it was time to comment. I though I could throw in my perspective as an EU citizen(now living in Canada, but considering moving back). My comment might be a bit long by the time I finish too so apoligies in advance, it’s a complicated issue.

    I’ll start off by saying that I find I do agree with a lot of what you write although you make some common false asumptions and downplay the importance of certain issues. There is definately a lot of racism, there is no doubt about that. The double standards are there as well.

    If the EU had been honest and just rejected their application straight out. As many would have prefered rather than stringing them along, you know there would have been political and economic consequences. Possibly complicating things with the Nabucco pipeline to name one example. The whole thing has been a political game for both sides, Turkey is hardly a victim despite the EU’s treatment. The EU means more than just an economic union, I believe it will eventually merge in to a single state if all goes well. Whether Turkey is brought in to that needs to be thought over very carefully. The timing of it is the key. Which is why Turkey shouldn’t play politics with the EU either. Neither side is ready right now and there is enough tension within the EU as is. It’s in need of major reforms first, as is Turkey.

    The majority of Europeans are still opposed to membership as well, that is a fact. If there was a European wide referendum held today, they would be rejected(check the polls). You can’t simply blame it on a few bad politicians we are talking about a majority of people here. Although I do agree with you on Sarkozy and I’m no fan of Van Rompuy either(I think they are both fools). I don’t think you can simply brush it off as racism either. There are many cultural similarities but a lot of differences that can’t be ignored either.

    You often talk about Turkeys potential but there is a famous saying “don’t count your chickens before they hatch” which applies here. If Turkey does reach their potential then that would take a lot of the fear away about the economy and possible immigration flood. As it currently stands though, the country is too poor and too populated. Europeans need to see results first before they start “guaranteeing” membership or setting any dates. As far as why Romania and Bulgaria joined, many Europeans weren’t happy about that either. My guess is that it was seen as a way to speed up the reforms there but without as much cultural and religious problems(especially with the way things are headed now). You’ve brushed aside the economy concerns before and talk about all the rich culture instead.

    That’s great and all but it means little to people who are worried about their jobs being lost to a massive flood of cheap labor. The EU also can’t afford Turkey as it is, I read that the estimates run as high as 2/3 of the EU’s budget to build up the country. If Turkey can make significant improvements within the next decade I’m sure the opposition would shrink.

    Sarkozy can make an ass of himself all he likes, he won’t be around forever. Despite the frozen chapters, only 1 has been sucessfuly closed. Turkey needs to show more effort on their part, there might be progress but the sucessfully closed chapters demonstrate a need for more effort.

    Religion is possibly the biggest reason, there is no denying that. As nice as it may sound, not all cultures are equal. That is not an insult but a fact. Under the right circumstances one can surpass the other as well. Europe was very primitive in comparison at one time as well. Yes Turkey is officially secular but how secular minded is the population as a whole? The country seems really divided. The transition from an agricultural economy won’t change the mindset or social norms of an entire population over night. Despite the similarities, the difference between Turks is also very wide, more so than many will admit. This article has me really concerned personally. Look at Turkey’s place at the bottom of that list. According to this Turkey is far more religious and backwards than the U.S. that is not a good think. Honestly if the U.S. was bordering Europe, I would not support a membership for them. I live right next door to them right now which is bad enough sometimes. Thankfully the overall stupidity of the country hasn’t yet rubbed off on us. Turkeys strong support for creationism over something as well established as evolution clearly shows how the country lags behind the rest of Europe. This is a very serious issue if you have paid attention to the U.S. and what the creationist movement has done over there in terms of dumbing down the population and using it to win the support of the lowest common denominator.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/bigphotos/21329204.html

    I think Eurabia is hysteria, it’s more likely that Islam will eventually modernise and eventually follow in the footsteps of Christianity. Realistically though, change like that takes a long time, a few generations even. It’s gonna be a very rough and somewhat unpleasant transition when you throw some 90m Turks (the population is estimated to reach 90m sometime after 2020) which could risk splitting the EU if not handled carefully.

    You can call the EU a Christian club all you like but I think you would be lying to yourself. Forget what Sarkozy and Van Rompuy say. They wish it was a christian club as christianity is slowly dying. Even the religious countries like Poland will follow the more secular ones in time. Ireland is proof of that. The new blasphemy law is a desperate attempt at what they see as they’re shrinking influence in the country. Christianity like Judaism is faiding away into irrelevance and becoming more of a cultural identity over a religious one.

    Islam on the other hand is growing and becoming more fundamentalist. Many immigrants are bringing with them their cultural and social problems. The Germans aren’t super positive about the Turkish population right now. Issues that Europeans have thought they had long dealt with are being brought back again. Europe has had a slow but healthy transition to a more secular state over the last 300 years. Turkey on the other hand has had secularism in place by force. That only ever works for a while as people don’t like being forced against their beliefs. This seems to have created a backlash within the more religious half of the country. Erdogans actions almost seem like a sort of pay back and attempt at social engineering against secularists.

    The EU politicians also have to be very careful now, they screwed up before and failed to do anything about it for too long. Now they are paying for it as the backlash is growing in EU. The consequences are a recent election of right wing polititions in the EU parliament and possible Dutch election of Girt Wilders. Im against the right wing nationalist myself but It’s needed to some degree to restore a little balance. Forcing political corectness and shutting people up will only result in an explosion of anger. Mixing in ‘too much’ of one religion and culture, Especially one that is viewed as more foreign will only cause problems at this time. Turkey seems to be in a real transitional stage right now.

    When Turkey first started their negotiations, I mostly supported them. I figured progress could be sped up under the EU. Realistically though, the EU has limits as well. I wanna see a strong and united Europe, I also wish all the best to Turkey and hope they do well. I have nothing against Turks personaly but have an issue with religion. That includes Christianity which has been like a cancer in the U.S. My country (Poland) unfortunately is still heavily influenced by the Vatican. Despite the fact that over 75% believe in seperation of church and state. It’s a little embarrasing sometimes as Poland often looks like the Kansas of the EU.

    It would probably be best if the EU focuses on the balkans for now. When Albania and Bosnia join, It would be more realistic for Turkey to follow after that time. The history of the Ottoman Empire is just that, history. Europeans need to forget that and move on already (there are idiots on both side of the fence). Turks also need to realize that this will be a long term plan which will likely benefit their children more than them. The attitude many Turks have demonstrated doesn’t help much either. It shows that they don’t truly understand the rejection The people I truly feel sorry for are the ones that would already fit in with a European mindset but are held back due to the rest of the country, for those I think there should be fair channels for strict immigration, for the rest, they need to catch up at their own speed. According to the polls it’s the younger generations that are most in support of Turkey in the EU. I would likely throw my support behind again as well If I saw major progress backed by a strong secularism that no longer needed the military.

    Sorry for the lengh again, it’s getting late and I’m tired.

  2. To Fox:

    “The majority of Europeans are still opposed to membership as well, that is a fact. If there was a European wide referendum held today, they would be rejected (check the polls).”

    Yes, in Europe most of the people would vote “No”, because they have strong prejudices regarding Turkey (moreover, the media and some politicians of the European Union make them afraid of Islam, and that doesn‘t help Turkey, which is a laic and democratic country). But the european commission will close the negotiations only when Turkey changes, in other words only when Turkey adapts its laws to the laws of the European Union. The europeans don’t know that. They don’t know that it’s the Turkey of tomorrow that will be a member.

    “You can’t simply blame it on a few bad politicians we are talking about a majority of people here. Although I do agree with you on Sarkozy and I’m no fan of Van Rompuy either (I think they are both fools). I don’t think you can simply brush it off as racism either. There are many cultural similarities but a lot of differences that can’t be ignored either.”

    Mr Sarkozy is a detail. And Mr Van Rompuy is a smaller detail. If Mr Sarkozy sabotage the negotiations and blocks 8 chapters, it’s not because of the opinion of the europeans, but because he really hates Turkey. Regarding the differences: there are many differences between the Finnish and the French/Italians/Greeks/Germans. Their common point is religion, and religion is the main difference between them and the Turks.

    “As it currently stands though, the country is too poor and too populated. Europeans need to see results first before they start “guaranteeing” membership or setting any dates.”

    13 million of turkish citizens have the average income of the EU citizens. Why saying that Turkey is too populated? Germany has 80 million people. The goal of the negotiations is the membership. And Turkey will be a member only when it complies with the EU laws. And when Turkey is a member, it will contribute to the EU budget.

    “As far as why Romania and Bulgaria joined, many Europeans weren’t happy about that either. My guess is that it was seen as a way to speed up the reforms there but without as much cultural and religious problems (especially with the way things are headed now).”

    You are wrong. Now that these countries are members of the EU, the pace of their reforms has slowed. Moreover, the judiciary is not independent in these countries but they were made members.

    “You’ve brushed aside the economy concerns before and talk about all the rich culture instead”

    As I have written above, Turkey is a big economic market with its 13 million citizens with their income that we can compare to the average income of the EU citizens. Turkey is the 5th biggest economy of the EU. Most of the european politcians who support Turkey’s EU membership support it for economic reasons. Olli Rehn said: “Turkey’s EU membership is vital for the EU”. But Mr Rehn doesn’t support Turkey only for economic reasons.

    “That’s great and all but it means little to people who are worried about their jobs being lost to a massive flood of cheap labor.”

    Günther Verheugen said that believing that millions of Turks will invade the EU makes no sense.

    “The EU also can’t afford Turkey as it is, I read that the estimates run as high as 2/3 of the EU’s budget to build up the country.”

    Since Spain is a member, it has received huge amonts of money from the EU. But that is not a problem. Why would it be a problem with Turkey?

    “Im against the right wing nationalist myself but It’s needed to some degree to restore a little balance.”

    I don’t agree with you.

    Regarding religion: I can only answer that there are twisted habits in every religion. The ones who really believe in God believe for themselves only, that’s why religion ought to remain private.

    And it’s a mistake to say that muslims can’t integrate into the european society (there are million of muslims in the EU, though we don’t have lots of troubles). There are certainly many issues regarding some muslim-rooted EU citizens, but these citizens don’t represent the whole muslim-rooted people.

    Religion plays an important role in every country. By the way, Greece is in a much worse situation than Turkey regarding the role of religion.

    Eventually, I have to stress that if Turkey has to be a member of the EU, it’s not because of religion but because of its close relations with the EU, which date back to 1963. Turkey always wanted to be an EU member for political reasons, and in 1963 religion was not a problem at all. Religion did become a problem later: muslims were really shown as dangerous people after 9/11. So we are manipulated, and the media are responsible for that.

    Religion must not be a reason for objecting to Turkey’s EU membership. Turkey is not responsible for the problems of the EU (and of the world). So people should stop showing Turkey as the source of the problems we face with nowadays in the EU.

    The media make people believe that some terrorists are muslim, but they can’t be muslim. They don’t represent Turkey, they don’t represent the muslims. A terrorist kills people, a terrorist can’t be a muslim or a christian, because a muslim, like a christian, can’t kill. Because all our main religions say: ‘Thou shalt not kill‘. Islam is not dangerous. The media are dangerous. The media mix Islam with terrorism, that is very dangerous.

    The question is the following: who control the media?

    Regards,

    Cem

  3. To Fox: I can’t publish your whole comment. I couldn’t approve it but I copied and pasted everything but its end. So below I quoted you, and you can find my answers:

    “13 million is only 17% of the population. That still leaves another 63m which is more than many EU countries combined.”

    You are wrong. You can’t take into account the whole popoulation, you must take into account the working people. Anyway, so what? Do you think that Spain was as rich as the other European Union countries before it joined the EU? What you write makes no sense.

    “So population does factor in, especially when the prediction has an almost 15m jump over the next decade.”

    15 million is far from being true. You really ought to change your source of information. Within 10 years, nearly 3-4 million is much more sensible.

    “It’s expected that Turkey will cost far more than Spain did too.”

    It’s neither a problem for the european commission or the EU countries which decided to open the negotiations in 2005, nor for Günther Verheugen or Olli Rehn, two strong supporters of Turkey’s EU membership. By the way, in 2014, the EU will vote its new budget, we will see then how much money it will foresee for the EU membership of Turkey that will probably occur in 2016-2018.

    « It still remains to be seen where Turkey will really be in a decade or so. »

    So for you it’s all about money? Let’s remember that the EU has spent huge amounts of money for countries such as Spain (100 billion euros), Greece (80 billion euros), Portugal (I don‘t know the amount) and some other countries. So these countries can be helped, but not Turkey? That is revealing, but I’m not surprised to face with that kind of opinion. As I already wrote yesterday, Turkey’s economy is the 5th biggest one of the EU. 10 years later, it will be much stronger. And Turkey will contribute to the EU budget. Moreover, Turkey has gas and oïl in the black sea and elsewhere in Turkey, so maybe that it will change its mind regarding its EU membership, as Norway. The EU has begged Norway for years in order to make it an EU member, but Norway always objected to that “offer”. Why? Because it is a rich country, it has oil and gas. Fox, know that I support Turkey’s EU membership but I do have doubts, not because Turkey has oïl and gas, but because the EU is corrupt and above all because a few people, who “represent” the whole EU, have too much power.
    So don’t worry, thanks to oïl and gas, thanks to its economy, thanks to its young people, Turkey may say a big “No” to the EU.

    “One thing I’ll give the country credit for is finally doing something about the military. That might be one of the most important steps to truly move the country forward. I’m really curious where things will go from here though, Europeans are right to be suspicious or Erdogan.”

    The military is losing weight and power in Turkey, so it’s not a problem anymore, the EU knows it. And the kurdish issue is being resolved. The main problems are the constitution and the independence of justice. Turkey has changed a lot, and it will keep on succeeding in those fields too.

    “As far as Romania and Bulgaria, I agree that it was a mistake. They should have been pressed harder from the start before being accepted. That is all the more reason to be cautious about expansion with Turkey or making any big promises.”

    Don’t worry the EU added many extra rules regarding Turkey’s negotiations. For instance the chapters will not be closed as they were closed with the previous candidates: I mean compared with the former candidate countries, once Turkey successfully finishes one chapter, it will have to wait a long time so that the chapter is closed. That is double standard. Promises? Wake up, Turkey was recognized an official candidate to the EU in 1999, and the negotiations began in 2005. The rules can’t be changed.

    “Most of the european politcians who support Turkey’s EU membership support it for economic reasons.”

    “That is exactly what I’m afraid of, if they “only” look at it from an economic perspective. Like most people, Europeans are afraid of major change, especially when it’s irreversible and will have a lasting impact on their lives. I imagine that many Turks would feel the same. You have to understand this as well when you look at the current political climate, it won’t change anytime soon. The transition needs to be slow and healthy. That is why Albania and Bosnia are a better starting point. A sucessful integration with them would probably go a long way to ease the tensions. The combined populations are somewhere around 8.2m, only 1/9 the size of Turkey right now.”

    Turkey will not have a negative impact on the europeans’ life, that is a big lie, a lie which Mr Bolkestein repeated many times. Turkey has been waiting since 1963. Saying that it has to wait more makes no sense.

    I can’t publish all you wrote.

    Regards,

    Cem

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